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A Family Tradition of Educators: Meet the Morphews

As some have discovered through ancestral research, our family tree unknowingly exerts a significant influence on our most important life decisions and outcomes.

While DNA isn't our absolute destiny, it is a starting point for who we become and what we do. The environment in which we grow up also influences how we answer key questions:

Why am I here?
What kind of person am I going to become?
Where am I going?

Some family trees are blessed with a plethora of educators who answered the call. Such is the case with the Morphew family, and I had the privilege of recently hosting a podcast conversation with Sue and Chris Morphew that illustrates this humble mindset.  The perspective of such experienced master educators provides valuable wisdom. 

 

 

 

In a completely rational society,
the best of us would be teachers and
the rest of us would have to
settle for something else.
— Lee Iacocca 

As you will hear in this conversation on our podcast, Sue Morphew and her husband set the example as educators who persevered through all of the challenges of life, family, and school. They never gave up on their calling to the work.

Even after retiring for the first time from many years teaching elementary students, Sue says she "flunked retirement" and returned to the classroom to inspire high school students in an alternative program. And she actually enjoyed this tour of duty even more!

Chris and his two siblings followed in their parent's footsteps, using different paths to become life-changing educators who courageously carry on this family tradition. Dr. Morphew is the Dean of the School of Education at Johns Hopkins University, where he is leading a transformation in response to the dynamic innovations happening across every sector of education. 

Leading faculty and families through periods of intense change is a distinct expertise that will be in greater and greater demand.

The growth and development of people
is the highest calling of leadership. 
— Harvey S. Firestone

To be an educator is a noble calling with motivation that goes beyond compensation. The most effective educators are all in, committed with mind, heart, soul, and body.

No one should be deterred from such a powerful life purpose, made to settle for less.

Yes, that means we love what we do and often let it consume us in service to others. 

Yes, that means we make sacrifices that are underappreciated and yet still rewarded.

Our lasting devotion is to a truth and belief that makes this a life that's worth living.

The price one pays for pursuing
any profession or calling is an
intimate knowledge of its ugly side.  
—  James Baldwin

We recognize the temptation to isolate and even commiserate with others about the heavy workload, the difficult schedule, and the relentless demands. But our calling is higher.

We inspire intelligence and wisdom.

We lift up the lost and defeated.

We give hope and a future.

Through our contagious love and courageous leadership, we create a pathway to a fulfilling life.

Despite the sacrifices, that's a career worth doing!

As long as there's more to be done,
you're not finished.
—  Sue Morphew

 

 

Listen to the School Growth podcast

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